Facies analysis and depositional framework of Late Permian-Jurassic sedimentary successions, Western Salt Range, Pakistan: implications for sequence stratigraphic trends and paleogeography of the Neo-Tethys Sea

DOI : 10.48129/kjs.16575

Authors

  • Abdul Basit Geological Survey of Pakistan, Quetta, Pakistan
  • Muhammad Umar The University of Haripur Pakistan http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4310-2448
  • Muhammad Jamil Department of Earth Sciences COMSATS University Islamabad, Abbottabad campus Pakistan https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0200-1851
  • Muhammad Qasim Department of Earth Sciences COMSATS University Islamabad, Abbottabad campus Pakistan

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.48129/kjs.16575

Abstract

Abstract
Facies analysis of sedimentary units were carried out by interpreting the evolution in depositional environments during Late Permian to Jurassic times in Western Salt Range, Pakistan. The results support the interpretation of sequence stratigraphic trends and pale geography of first megasequence phase of Neo-Tehthys Sea. Sedimentological details, sequence stratigraphic framework and sea level curve of Late-Permain to Jurassic Strata indicate that the sedimentation was highly influenced by tectonic activities occurring at the vicinities of southwestern part of NeoTethys. During Late Permian, the rift related magmatic activities deceased which led to the onset of transgression and deposition of shelfal carbonates (Wargal Formation). At the end of Late
Permian, the phase of extensive regression due to various rifting events and tectonic uplifts which caused the onset of terrigenous shelves and deltaic successions at various intervals of deposition. The closure of Paleo-Tethys and development of semi-arid hot tropical climate during LateTriassic, resulted the onset of tidal-lagoonal environments in Kingriali Formation. During Early Jurassic, a well-documented northward drift of Pangaea resulted the global cooling and increased humidity, which intern resulted the development of clastic-carbonate mixed sedimentation, whose record is documented in the form of Datta and Samana Suk formations.

Author Biographies

Abdul Basit, Geological Survey of Pakistan, Quetta, Pakistan

Assistant Director Geological Survey of Pakistan

Muhammad Umar, The University of Haripur Pakistan

Department of Earth sciences and Professor

Muhammad Jamil, Department of Earth Sciences COMSATS University Islamabad, Abbottabad campus Pakistan

Lecturer Department of Earth Sciences COMSATS University Islamabad Abbottabad Campus Pakistan

Ph.D. Scholar Department of Geosciences, Univeristi Teknologi PETRONAS (UTP), Seri Iskandar,
32610 Perak, Malaysia

Muhammad Qasim, Department of Earth Sciences COMSATS University Islamabad, Abbottabad campus Pakistan

Assistant Professor Department of Earth Sciences COMSATS University Islamabad, Abbottabad campus
Pakistan

Published

04-08-2022

Issue

Section

Earth & Environment